SILVIA TAVARES

Healthy, happy and tropical – world’s fastest-growing cities demand our attention

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Marine Drive in Mumbai, viewed here from across Chowpatty Beach, is an ‘accidental’ planning legacy that’s now one of the most popular places in the city. Dirk Ott/Shutterstock

Karine Dupré, Griffith University; Jane Coulon, École Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture Montpellier, and Silvia Tavares, James Cook University

What does it take to be a happy and healthy city? In any city, myriad factors go into the mix – and of course we are not dealing with just one kind of city. But, due to the world history of colonisation, models are still too often European-centric. In particular, we need to adjust how we think about cities in the tropics. Read more…

Making a global agenda work locally for healthy, sustainable living in tropical Australia

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Planning and design for healthy, liveable communities in the Australian tropics can involve quite different considerations from those that apply down south. Silvia Tavares, Author provided

Silvia Tavares, James Cook University and David Sellars, James Cook University

Life in the tropics is often seen as “living in paradise”, a place where everything grows and flourishes. This picture-postcard environment is not the year-round reality. At certain times of year, intense heat, humidity and the wet season affect liveability, making outdoor activity unattractive and thereby reducing social cohesion. Read more…

On markets – Have they ever died?

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Palm Cove Market (Cairns, Australia)

The recent resurgence of public markets is just a beginning. Markets spark urban revitalization, foster community diversity and improve public health. We’re on the verge of a new era of market cities, with expansive networks to connect people and places. (Project for Public Spaces*)

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To study only the larger assemblage of the city or neighbourhood and its planning framework is to ignore the ways that conceptions of place, urban character and creative clustering are emergent effects of a multitude of small-scale adaptations.

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Professional Practice and Landscape Architecture office visits

This post was originally published at The SoLA Blog, the blog of the School of Landscape Architecture at Lincoln University.

The SoLA Blog

Professional Practice (SOCI 314) is a shared course delivered by the Faculty of Environment, Society and Design at Lincoln University, and shared between the School of Landscape Architecture and the Department of Environmental Management.

The aim of the course is to provide students with an opportunity to critically study issues related to the provision of professional services in environmental planning and design. Therefore, students develop a critical understanding of the social, ethical, and organisational issues involved in the provision of professional services.

The course is divided in two streams: BLA and BEM/BEPP. BLA students have recently had the opportunity to visit Landscape Architecture practices including Christchurch City Council, Jeremy Head and Andrew Craig’s practice and Rough and Milne, where they were received by Tony Milne.

These office visits covered topics such as work flows, office structure and practice mode, collaboration, charging out and invoicing, work sources, software used, hand drawing…

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Second year students visit preschool

The post below was originally published at The SoLA Blog, the blog of the School of Landscape Architecture at Lincoln University.

The SoLA Blog

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LASC 216 (Site Design) students have visited their very first real-life client, the Lincoln University Childhood Centre (LUECC). The site visit happened on the July 7 and was aimed at collecting information that will support a class project focused on the redesign of the LUECC outdoor area, including their gardens and playground areas.

The project involves the preparation of a landscape concept plan, and a concept for planting design. Students’ proposals shall respond to the client’s requirements as highlighted in the site visit.

Students have until July 29 to develop their proposals with the support of their tutors and project leaders Silvia Tavares and Jess Rae.

This is the first of a three-stage project where the students will then have the chance to go deeper into defining planting strategies and construction details (LASC 216 Project 2). After the conclusion of Project 2 students will have a chance to present their projects to the LUECC staff and parents…

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[Man] will adapt to hydrocarbons in the air, detergents in the water, crime in the streets, and crowded recreational areas. Good design becomes a meaningless tautology if we consider that man will be reshaped to fit whatever environment he creates. The long-range question is not so much what sort of environment we want, but what sort of man we want.

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