The Comfort Pursuit

Month in review: January and February 2018

Photo by Christopher Sardegna on Unsplash

I returned to work after parental leave just over a month ago. This post is also a return to a self-analysis series of ‘month in reviews’ which has helped me keep motivated. These posts haven’t been published for almost a year now, so it is time for a return and a bit of update now that life seems to be finding its way to a new normal. Read more…

Cities can grow without wrecking reefs and oceans. Here’s how

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Cairns has lots of hard grey infrastructure but much less green infrastructure that would reduce the impacts of the city’s growth.
Karine Dupré, Author provided

Silvia Tavares, James Cook University and Karine Dupré, Griffith University

What happens if the water temperature rises by a few degrees?” is the 2018 International Year of the Reef leading question. While the ocean is the focus, urbanisation is the main reason for the rising temperatures and water pollution. Yet it receives little attention in this discussion.

In turn, rising temperatures increase downpours and urban floods, adding to the pressures on urban infrastructure. Read more…

Thinkers in the Tropical Shade: Empowering Lessons for Livable Places

Cairns, Queensland, Australia: avoiding the humidity using active transport (Photo by Chuck Wolfe)

Last June, Chuck Wolfe, David Sellars and I published an article on Planetizen about the fundamental relationships at the heart of urban public health and livability, particularly in tropical Australia. In this article we discuss the importance of context, the relevance of the UN-Habitat New Urban Agenda, the Urban Thinkers Campuses recently hosted by JCU (Understanding Cairns and Townsville through the urban diary tool), place-based urban planning and design and the lessons learned so far.

Read more…

‘ENOUGH’- The importance of limit-setting for writing

Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

“(…) limit-setting means learning to . . .

1. ​Start writing before you may feel you’re ready.

2. ​Finish writing before you may feel you’re ready.

3. Know when you’ve done enough with your writing project.

Knowing when you’ve done enough or that you can begin without over-preparation is a critical skill in writing efficiently and painlessly. Without this kind of knowing, writing problems loom at the ready. Without limit-setting, professors expose themselves to an especially insidious kind of stress–of never being able to leave campus feeling they’ve done enough.”

Read more…