SILVIA TAVARES

Book recommendation: ‘Draw Your Day: An Inspiring Guide to Keeping a Sketch Journal’, by Samantha Dion Baker

Draw Your Day: An Inspiring Guide to Keeping a Sketch JournalDraw Your Day: An Inspiring Guide to Keeping a Sketch Journal by Samantha Dion Baker
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I’ve always loved to keep memories, but for a while I have been frustrated by the fact that I haven’t been able to keep up with it. I’ve also been frustrated because I haven’t been drawing enough.
While I have tried different styles of journalling, I always feel like I am behind in one or another (keeping memories or drawing). Read more…

Suburbanites walk perpendicular. Urbanites walk parallel.

Suburban land is organized by purpose, and suburban experience consequently tends to be selective, single-variable, and destination-centric. One travels to or among destinations, with each answering to one goal. The journey between is generally not designed to have experiential value. This is why, when suburbanites shop at a strip mall, they often walk only between car and front door. If using more than one store, they often return to their car, drive a short distance, and repeat the direct line of engagement to the next destination. Urban experience is continuous, oblique, and incidental. It is all-at-once rather than one-at-a-time. Although one may move through an urban setting with a destination in mind, the journey to it will be rich, varied, and engaging.

Read more…

Ilse Crawford on Interior Design

(…) We spend 87% of our lives inside buildings.
How they are designed really affects how we feel, how we behave.
Design is not just a visual thing.
It is a thought process. It is a skill.
Ultimately design is a tool to enhance our humanity.
It is a frame for life.

(Ilse Crawford: Interior Design; in Abstract: The Art of Design) Read more…

Cities will endure, but urban design must adapt to coronavirus risks and fears

Public spaces must now meet our need to be ‘together but apart’.
Silvia Tavares, Author provided

 

Silvia Tavares, University of the Sunshine Coast and Nicholas Stevens, University of the Sunshine Coast

The long-term impacts of coronavirus on our cities are difficult to predict, but one thing is certain: cities won’t die. Diseases have been hugely influential in shaping our cities, history shows. Cities represent continuity regardless of crises – they endure, adapt and grow. Read more…

Months in review: March and April 2020

Last time I wrote a month in review post I had just got back to work after maternity leave. At that point I was hoping that I would take control of my time, but it didn’t happen quite that way. In 2019 I invested A LOT in conferences, workshops, and collaborations. Some extremely valuable and fruitful, others not so much. One of my main goals for 2020 is to learn how to better focus on the most important things and make wiser choices. Read more…

JCU street sketching in Townsville: An approach to drawing on location and recording what you see

Disclaimer: This is the first of a series of very delayed posts. A lot has been happening in the past few months, hence my silence. I definitely have to get better in sharing things here in ‘real time’, or at last as close to ‘real’ as possible.

Since I was a kid I always loved sketching and I was fortunate enough to be able to make that also part of my work. On 7th September, I organised a sketching workshop led by Richard Briggs. Read more…

Urban growth, heat islands, humidity, climate change: the costs multiply in tropical cities

During a heatwave in late 2018, Cairns temperatures topped 35°C nine days in a row and sensors at some points in the CBD recorded 45°C.

Taha Chaiechi, James Cook University and Silvia Tavares, James Cook University

Some 60% of the planet’s expected urban area by 2030 is yet to be built. This forecast highlights how rapidly the world’s people are becoming urban. Cities now occupy about 2% of the world’s land area, but are home to about 55% of the world’s people and generate more than 70% of global GDP, plus the associated greenhouse gas emissions.

So what does this mean for people who live in the tropical zones, where 40% of the world’s population lives? On current trends, this figure will rise to 50% by 2050. With tropical economies growing some 20% faster than the rest of the world, the result is a swift expansion of tropical cities. Read more…