SILVIA TAVARES

Suburbanites walk perpendicular. Urbanites walk parallel.

Suburban land is organized by purpose, and suburban experience consequently tends to be selective, single-variable, and destination-centric. One travels to or among destinations, with each answering to one goal. The journey between is generally not designed to have experiential value. This is why, when suburbanites shop at a strip mall, they often walk only between car and front door. If using more than one store, they often return to their car, drive a short distance, and repeat the direct line of engagement to the next destination. Urban experience is continuous, oblique, and incidental. It is all-at-once rather than one-at-a-time. Although one may move through an urban setting with a destination in mind, the journey to it will be rich, varied, and engaging.

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Ilse Crawford on Interior Design

(…) We spend 87% of our lives inside buildings.
How they are designed really affects how we feel, how we behave.
Design is not just a visual thing.
It is a thought process. It is a skill.
Ultimately design is a tool to enhance our humanity.
It is a frame for life.

(Ilse Crawford: Interior Design; in Abstract: The Art of Design) Read more…

‘Streetfight’

“Every community has excuses for why changing the way they use their streets is impossible, impractical, or just insane. I learned firsthand that there is no end to the reasons for inaction. But inaction is inexcusable. As our cities grow, leaders and the people they serve cannot accept dysfunctional streets; they must fight to change them. The fight for these changes—well, that’s just part of the job.”

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‘ENOUGH’- The importance of limit-setting for writing

Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

“(…) limit-setting means learning to . . .

1. ​Start writing before you may feel you’re ready.

2. ​Finish writing before you may feel you’re ready.

3. Know when you’ve done enough with your writing project.

Knowing when you’ve done enough or that you can begin without over-preparation is a critical skill in writing efficiently and painlessly. Without this kind of knowing, writing problems loom at the ready. Without limit-setting, professors expose themselves to an especially insidious kind of stress–of never being able to leave campus feeling they’ve done enough.”

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